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Bleezers Ice Cream Poem Analysis Essays

This lesson came with the help from a fellow art teacher.  This lesson was intended for students to use their critical thinking skills by interrogating across the curriculum.  3rd graders read the poem "Bleezer's Ice Cream" by Jack Prelutsky, if you're not familiar with it, it's too good not to post.

I am Ebenezer Bleezer,

I run BLEEZER'S ICE CREAM STORE,

there are flavors in my freezer

you have never seen before,

twenty-eight divine creations

too delicious to resist,

why not do yourself a favor,

try the flavors on my list:

COCOA MOCHA MACARONI

TAPIOCA SMOKED BALONEY

CHECKERBERRY CHEDDAR CHEW

CHICKEN CHERRY HONEYDEW

TUTTI-FRUTTI STEWED TOMATO

TUNA TACO BAKED POTATO

LOBSTER LITCHI LIMA BEAN

MOZZARELLA MANGOSTEEN

ALMOND HAM MERINGUE SALAMI

YAM ANCHOVY PRUNE PASTRAMI

SASSAFRAS SOUVLAKI HASH

SUKIYAKI SUCCOTASH

BUTTER BRICKLE PEPPER PICKLE

POMEGRANATE PUMPERNICKEL

PEACH PIMENTO PIZZA PLUM

PEANUT PUMPKIN BUBBLEGUM

BROCCOLI BANANA BLUSTER

CHOCOLATE CHOP SUEY CLUSTER

AVOCADO BRUSSELS SPROUT

PERIWINKLE SAUERKRAUT

COTTON CANDY CARROT CUSTARD

CAULIFLOWER COLA MUSTARD

ONION DUMPLING DOUBLE DIP

TURNIP TRUFFLE TRIPLE FLIP

GARLIC GUMBO GRAVY GUAVA

LENTIL LEMON LIVER LAVA

ORANGE OLIVE BAGEL BEET

WATERMELON WAFFLE WHEAT

I am Ebenezer Bleezer,

I run BLEEZER'S ICE CREAM STORE,

taste a flavor from my freezer,

you will surely ask for more.

3rd Graders loved this poem, of course you had to leave some room for the "EWWWW's" and the "AHHHH's." After reading the poem students talked about some of the poetic elements of rhyming and alliteration.  Students were then asked to brainstorm five flavors of ice cream combining foods that do not go together and adding some sort of ending like twist, swirl, dip, blast, etc. We then drew a five scooped ice cream cone together writing the flavors next to the scoop.  Students were then instructed to add detail to their scoops making them look like the flavor they created.  To finish them off we used colored pencil and if students had extra space they were to create a sign for their ice cream shop.

Here is my example:

Student Examples:




An 8th-grade student walks into a classroom and sits down at a desk. With a freshly-sharpened pencil, the student is preparing to take the state writing assessment. As part of this assessment, the student will be expected to complete a descriptive essay in 90 minutes. This is the writing prompt: “Describe one activity you enjoy.” If you’ve ever had a conversation with an 8th-grader, you know they’d be able to sum their answer up in one sentence! Yet, they are expected to compile a detailed, descriptive essay about a vague topic.

So what does art have to do with state writing assessments? Well, we often teach our students that art tells a story and contains meaning. Art can be viewed as its own visual language. Sometimes a student just needs a really good idea to have something worthwhile to write about. Art can be that good idea to inspire writing!

Today I am going to share 6 art projects that incorporate writing and turn your students’ imagery into a written story.

1. Bleezer’s Ice Cream


This project is inspired by Jack Prelutsky’s poem “Bleezer’s Ice Cream.” Share the poem with your students and give them the task of inventing their own ice cream flavors. To throw in a twist, have your students create flavors only using alliterations. Take the project even further by having students visualize and depict their flavors. Your students will have so much fun inventing wacky flavors they’ll probably forget they were even writing!

2. Smashing Faces


This AOE Lesson Plan takes a traditional concept, the self-portrait, and turns it into an entirely new idea. Creating self-portraits just got fun again! After finishing their drawings, have students write narratives about them. Why are their faces smashed? What are they looking at? What’s happening? Did they just witness an extraordinary event? The creativity to answer these prompts will be sure to flow right off the page!

3. Emotional Weaving

To start this project have your students select an emotion. Then, using the 5 senses, challenge your students to create a written description of that emotion. For example, what does anger look like? What does it feel like? What noises would you associate with anger?

Students will then use their written descriptions as a jumping off point for a piece of art as they depict their emotion through the use of color and line. Finally, students will use that piece of art to create a paper weaving.  To take the project even further, you might want to try weaving together two different emotions!

4. Abandoned Cars


One of the key components to successful writing is a starting with a solid theme. Giving students a theme of “an abandoned car” provides a great starting point for a creative visual story. When finished, or even as they work, encourage your students to write a story based on experience or fiction that describes their drawing.

5. Blackout Poetry


Challenge your students to see written words as an art form. Blackout poetry focuses on rearranging words to create a different meaning. This project will force your students to think critically as they search for anchor words that create a powerful story. Encourage the use of imagery and color to bring more meaning to the message.

6. Fan Fiction


It’s no question that students of all ages are fascinated with the characters from movies and television. Allow your students to create a project based on one of their favorite characters. Whether it’s a LEGO, Minion, or superhero, expose your students to the fan fiction writing style. As students work, have them write about their pieces. You may even want to suggest that they write a sequel to their favorite movie or book.

Writing and art can be used together to strengthen each other. Making it a practice to incorporate writing alongside art lessons will only benefit your students. If you’re new to incorporating writing in your art room, start simply. Try out one of the ideas presented here to get started!

What are your favorite projects that incorporate writing?

How often do your students write in your art room?

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